Father Figures

It has been an eventful week for the two most influential men in my life aside from my husband and son.

A week ago, my dad was exercising at the local YMCA and went into cardiac arrest while on one of the weight machines. Talk about being at the right place at the right time. Had he been anywhere else – at home, in the car, in the grocery store – he probably wouldn’t still be with us. However, the staff was so alert and well trained and literally saved his life by performing CPR and using the defibrillator. He underwent quadruple bypass surgery earlier this week and is now in recovery in the cardio-pulmonary surgery unit of a renowned local hospital, where he is in a state of confusion at the moment. When we were on our way to the hospital after his collapse, we had no information about his condition and didn’t know what to expect. I was so grateful to be able to talk with him at the hospital later that evening and found it somehow comforting and reassuring that he had no recollection of the cardiac event. He remembered being on the exercise bike and then waking up in the hospital. So perhaps when something like this happens, it is much more traumatic for those witnessing it than for the victim.

Since then, my mother has spoken with the person responsible for saving my dad’s life by simply doing what he was trained to do. Perhaps he doesn’t consider himself a hero, but he most certainly is, and my family will be forever grateful to him. He saved the life of a father, husband, grandfather, brother, and uncle who perhaps didn’t understand how much he is loved and cherished – or by how many people – until this happened. So there is a blessing in this. To have the opportunity to express and receive love is a blessing. Another blessing for me personally is that my priorities have shifted. A brush with death (a loved one’s, if not our own) can certainly shake a person awake and set us straight, reminding us of what is most important. The small stuff just falls away, and we have the chance to realign and rebuild.

[If I could, I would insert a photo here of my mom holding my dad’s hand the day after his surgery. However, I did not have a camera with me at the time.]

Tonight I also learned that the man whom I considered my spiritual father passed on today. David came into my life at exactly the right time, when I was going into eighth grade. “When the student is ready, the teacher appears” was absolutely true in this case. He was a social studies teacher at my high school, although I never had him for a teacher; I met him through one of his sons. A fellow Pisces, he introduced me to spirituality, Eastern philosophy, Jungian psychology, Edgar Cayce, astrology, and dream work and was a spiritual compass who helped me to rise above the superficial preoccupations of teenage life. He gave me Richard Bach’s novel, Illusions, as a high school graduation present, and the story made a big impression on me. Convinced that my life’s purpose was to offer my talents in service of others, he introduced me to the field of music therapy and sent me articles and books on that topic. (My undergraduate senior thesis was on music therapy because of his influence.) He also gave me magazine subscriptions (The Quest, Heron Dance, etc.) as gifts for several years. For Christmas this year, he gave me a two-year gift subscription to Joan Chittister’s The Monastic Way, and when I received it, I knew the subscription would outlive him. We maintained an ongoing correspondence throughout the years, and I have probably what amounts to an entire box of letters he wrote me when I was in college and grad school and in between and afterward, when I was trying to figure out my place in the world. He remained a spiritual teacher and friend until the end. He loved to talk and always told such intriguing stories, almost always on spiritual and metaphysical themes. My children and both husbands were close to him, as well. He was family. He was my hero who always encouraged me to find spiritual, loving solutions to the challenges I encountered.

In hindsight, I find it interesting that this morning I was thinking of one of my former students who has a particular talent and interest, and how I’d like to introduce him to a certain performing group that he might find inspiring. It’s the first time I’ve ever had that kind of thought in connection with a student. When this child came into my classroom this morning to say hi (as he does most mornings, just as I stopped into David’s classroom every day when I was in high school), I asked him if he’s ever heard of the group and promised to bring in a DVD for him. I felt as if David’s spirit was being channeled through me; only this time I was the teacher, not the student. How interesting that, unbeknown to me at the time, David had died a few hours earlier.

I saw him for the last time in October, when he came for a visit on a sunny autumn day and sat at the kitchen table in the seat with the best view of the river. It was a lovely visit. He seemed at peace and so full of love. At one point, I felt his spirit shining through so strongly and beautifully that I just had to photograph him – and I am so grateful now that I did this. (It was the only time I ever did this in all my decades of knowing him.) Before he left, he spoke about wanting to get together again soon. But I also sensed an unspoken goodbye somewhere in there, and when he drove away, my heart sunk as I wondered if that would be the last time I’d see him. But he looked so healthy and radiant that day, and that is how I will remember him.

I am going to miss him so much and shed plenty of tears tonight, although the whole time I couldn’t shake the image of him smiling and even chuckling. I think of the scene in the movie Field of Dreams in which the writer character played by James Earl Jones was invited into the cornfield and laughs as as he takes his first steps into the unknown – the great adventure. After retiring from teaching, David spent several years at the end of his life researching and writing books about ghosts and hauntings both in our region and around the world, and this is how I imagine him walking through the doorway of death. I spent a long time sitting on the riverside tonight beside a candle, visualizing him bathed in light and releasing him to the light.

I also find it interesting that when I was snowshoeing over the weekend, I was really drawn to this image:

I wrote a poem nearly 25 years ago that David really liked and that he told me he shared with several people. Although I’m sure I will come across many profound quotes in letters and emails he sent me through the years, I shall offer this poem here in cyberspace as a tribute to David. After a life well lived, may he rest in peace.

I AM NOT GONE

I am not gone – 
    I have simply changed my form.

You will find me
    In the coolness of a raindrop
    And in leaves that brighten the autumn ground.

You will hear my voice
    In the whisper of a falling stream

And feel my touch
    When the warmth of the sun meets your skin.

My soul will travel to you
    In the flight of a seagull

And you will see my smile
    In a fresh, summer flower.

I am the energy that fills your spirit
    When you witness the beauty of nature.

We are called together
    When you remember a time we shared
    For I exist within those thoughts.

Whenever your heart is touched
    You are receiving the gift of my love

And every time you cherish me
    My soul is blessed.


—————————
© Susan Meyer and River Bliss, 2012-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, including all photos, without express and written permission from this blog’s author/owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Susan Meyer and River Bliss (www.riverblissed.blogspot.com) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.